Finally, A Scientific Justification for Peeing in Your Wet Suit!!!

Good news for all of us who occasionally loose our bladders while diving! You can now release yourself from shame, guilt, or recrimination for this little urinary indiscretion. Scientists have come up with an explanation about what causes this momentary lapse in good hygiene standards. And guess what? All mammals do it! Check out this repost below and follow the links to the inertia.com to learn more!

What Science Says About Peeing in Your Wetsuit
If you have a beating heart, you pee in your wetsuit.  Scientists are aware you urinate in your wetsuit. While many people feel like this is weird, it’s completely natural. It’s the norm amongst surfers and divers – even if they don’t all admit to it. As a waterman, you’re experiencing a unique underwater phenomenon called immersion diuresis. Don’t panic though. There is a totally legit scientific reason    for this.
So, why do we pee in our wetsuits and what is actually happening inside your body?
Immersion diuresis, which literally means “water loss due to immersion,” is the culprit behind that urge to pee when you are in the water. Whether you are surfing, Scuba diving, or just going for a swim, the lower temperature and increased pressure of the surrounding water makes you pee. It’s really as simple as that.
Immersion diuresis is a physiological response to being submerged in water and it’s actually part of the Mammalian Dive Reflex. When the body is immersed in water the colder temperatures and increased pressure from the surrounding environment causes a narrowing of the blood vessels (vasoconstriction) in your extremities. As a result of this vasoconstriction, your body moves blood volume away from your skin and extremities and redistributes it towards your core areas.
This increased blood volume, which is sent directly to your vital organs, triggers the inhibition of a vasopressin hormone that regulates the production of urine by the kidneys called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH). ADH essentially controls how much urine your kidneys produce and the increased blood volume being sent to your core areas tricks the body into thinking that there is a fluid overload (which kinda makes sense because you are surrounded by water). As a result, the body stops making ADH which triggers the kidneys to produce urine in an attempt to regain the fluid balance (ie. homeostasis) caused by that increased blood volume. So this is what really makes you pee in your wetsuit.
Now that you know this, peeing in your wetsuit is a totally legit thing to do – really it’s science. You have permission to no longer feel weird or ashamed. All the cool kids are doing it. Just make sure that you drink a lot of water before and after your session to avoid dehydration!

Seal of Approval

One of the best reasons to dive Catalina is the variety: the variety of animals, the variety of dive sites, the variety of underwater terrain. If you want to explore a kelp forest, or search the sandy areas for bat rays, or look deep into rocky crags for eels, it’s all available at Catalina—sometimes in one dive site!
Over Labor Day weekend, the Barnacle Busters took a group of newly certified divers, students and long-time members aboard the Cee Ray for another fantastic summer day. We were all eagerly waiting for our first dive; some had new cameras to test out, some had new computers or masks they were breaking in. I was eager too, but that didn’t stop me from climbing into a bunk for an hour-long snooze on the way to the island after a hearty breakfast!
Our first stop was Johnson’s Rock and the kelp forest there was something to behold! After seeing these areas just a few short years ago with zero kelp, it’s such a huge relief to see them thriving and strong again. We spent our whole dive in the forest, working our way along the rocky edge where it was exceptionally healthy. I stopped to have a deeper look and was rewarded with a juvenile spotted shark sleeping under a rocky overhang. There were plenty of abalone around as well, so I took a moment to feed one some kelp.
From there we moved to Black Rock and our surface interval was spent munching down on some Monkey Bread, a Cee Ray specialty! Yum … Black Rock happens to be one of those all-in-one dive sites. There are the sandy areas, the rocky crags, the kelp forest, pretty much everything something for everyone.
This dive started a bit awkwardly with some computer failure and other malfunctions threatening to abort the dive. I took one buddy back to the surface and then went back for the others, but they had left the spot where I had left them (they had malfunctions of their own as it turned out). I decided to circle the area for signs of them and felt a tug on my fin. Thinking it might be one of my buddies, I turned to find a Harbor Seal looking at me like he wanted to play. I grabbed my GoPro and got it rolling as I tried to follow the seal through the kelp. It was too fast for me, so I switched off the camera and headed back to where I was and then I saw the seal again below me turning over abalone shells, looking for a meal. I switched the camera back on, and the seal gave me a little show, not at all bashful like others I’d seen at Catalina. After a few minutes and a couple more tugs on my fins, the seal left, on to more distractions. But I was exhilarated!
Once we were all on board, we discussed our various gear misfortunes and misunderstandings and made plans for the next dive, which would also be at Black Rock. While variety is a big bonus, sometimes there are good reasons to stay and dive at the same site. In this case, other sites we had looked at along the way had currents that would have made the diving difficult, so best to stay where the conditions are best. Plus, I may get to see that little seal again! While the seal was a no-show for round two, we still saw plenty: a shy-but-curious octopus, several bat rays hovering by, a few juvenile sharks napping and a ton of sea hares!
Back on board we ate dessert and had video show-and-tell on our laptops before retiring to the bunks for a ride-home snooze.
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Membership Renewal Just Got Simpler

Thanks to club members Scott Weber, Rex Theobald, and Gary Nugent, renewing your Barnacle Busters membership just became a whole lot easier! We now offer an online renewal option for our members. Before your membership expires, you will receive an email from us letting you know its time to renew. Within that email will be a summary of the contact information that we have on file for you. This is the perfect time to let us know if anything has changed in your life over the past year. Just reply to the email with any corrections that you’d like us to make.

Also included in the email will be a reminder of the waiver that you originally signed when you joined. Simply click the link to the website (indicating that you agree the terms of the waiver) and you’ll be taken to a page on our secure website when you can use your credit card to renew your membership before it expires. No postage or check writing required! Pretty simple, right!

 

A CDN Shore Dive Refresher

In anticipation of our upcoming Earthday Shore dive on April 22nd, please check out this link to a great article in California Diving News from our friend Dale Scheckler. His tips for diving the California shoreline cover training, planning and execution of successful, low-stress dive strategies that’ll be helpful to both veterans and newbies alike! Let’s face it, even the most accomplished California diver has taken a few tumbles in the surf dues to miss-reading area conditions. Be ready!

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Anacapa Action

For the second year in a row, conditions for the Ventura-Anacapa crossing were favorable: No giant swells, no seasickness, no spray soaking the flying bridge. 18 divers chatted and grazed on donuts and coffee as we cruised to the first dive site, Goldfish Bowl.


We listened as the first divers hit the water, relieved to NOT hear and cold-water screams. Temperature was a cozy 70-72F. Anacapa diving is generally shallow, which was perfect for Open Water student Gia, who performed her skills with ease. Goldfish Bowl is not known for kelp beds, but there was a lovely stand towards the south end of the site where we saw abalone, lobster and about a million vibrant juvenile garibaldi. Sharon & Nixie spotted a large Giant Black Sea Bass at the beginning of the dive.


 At Caverns, divers explored grottos, drifting with the mellow surge in the shallows. We were delighted to find dense kelp here too. Also a spotted harbor seal and black sea bass sightings here. Gia and I didn’t see anything out of the ordinary but had a blast gliding through the forest while she perfected her buoyancy. I love watching new divers as they begin to “get it.”

After lunch, we dived the wreck of the Winfield Scott, an old paddle-wheeler sunk sometime last century. While there’s not much left of the wreck, there is a spectacular swim-through and a ton of kelp. And this area is home to squads of large sheephead. By the third dive, Gia was cruising like an experienced pro and I Was happy to certify her!


By coincidence, this was also LGBT Pride weekend in Ventura so a bunch of divers, including Raptor owners Jim & Christie Price, migrated to the fairgrounds to rock to GayC/DC’s stellar, crowd pleasing performance.

It was a great day and our hearty thanks to the always excellent crew of the Raptor.

Cozumel: Qué Aventura

The recent Barnacle Buster club trip to Cozumel was an amazing adventure to say the least. The flight home was a rough return to reality and in stark contrast to the rest of the trip, but it didn’t matter. We were still flying high from diving in Cozumel.

Seven days earlier . . .

For Thomas and me, Cozumel was a series of firsts: first time to Cozumel, first night dive, first time swimming with an octopus, first time seeing a Splendid Toad Fish, first dive spotting a Seahorse, first fresh water dive, first time diving through caves . . . well, you get the point.

Continue reading “Cozumel: Qué Aventura”